Collaborative Impact grants

A unique grant model.

 
 

Collaborative Impact Grants

Each of our grants is an ongoing, transformational relationship with a community. We partner with exceptional organizations and work together to create a stable, productive, and self-sufficient Puerto Rico.

After the disaster created by Hurricane Maria and Irma in 2017, ConPRmetidos evaluated and engaged with Puerto Rican communities to identify their post-Hurricane needs. ConPRmetidos found that many nonprofits in Puerto Rico needed both resources and organizational support in order to execute their programs efficiently and effectively. The Collaborative Impact Grant model was conceived to support organizations in executing programs according to plan, strengthen and scale up their work, increase their influence, and achieve a greater impact. ConPRmetidos’ collaborative impact grants finance programs that tackle root causes to socio-economic challenges in Puerto Rico and assigns each program necessary resources. Take a look at our spotlight grants below to witness the different communities ConPRmetidos is helping transform through its unique CIG model.

 

Your donations finance grants in these four areas:

 
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Proyecto de la Montaña: The PUERTO RICO COFFEE INDUSTRY REHABILITATION PROJECT

Nearly 18 million coffee trees and approximately 85% of the island's coffee farms were wiped out. The losses in income for coffee growing families is estimated at over $27 million, with losses to the local coffee industry estimated at over $75 million. Proyecto de la Montaña is a collaboration between ConPRmetidos, local coffee experts, local nonprofit PROCAFE, Unidos por Puerto Rico, and National Baseball Hall of Fame catcher, Ivan ‘Pudge’ Rodriguez.

The $608,500 grant will enable PROCAFE to distribute 750,000 coffee tree seedlings, fertilizer and cash subsidies to over 500 small coffee farm families in Puerto Rico, ensuring they have the means to survive, while getting organized to restart their coffee farming.

 
 

REFORESTATION OF the VIEQUES BIOLUMINESCENT BAY

The Vieques Bioluminescent Bay is one of the last remaining pristine bioluminescent bays in the world and the main natural attraction that drives Vieques’ tourism-based economy. Hurricane Maria and Irma devastated the built infrastructure and mangrove forest surrounding the Bay which is an integral part of its ecology. The bioluminescent plankton that gives the Bay its glow depends on the nutrients from the mangrove to survive. The plankton’s glow attracts 50,000 to 70,000 visitors a year from all over the globe, generating hundreds of direct and indirect jobs. The restoration of the natural and built infrastructure means new job opportunities (temporary ones during restoration, permanent ones in tourism), that are much needed in Vieques after the hurricanes.

ConPRmetidos’ $50,000 grant to The Vieques Conservation & Historical Trust will finance the reforestation and rehabilitation of the critical areas of the Bay where there was total mangrove death, new mangrove plant nurseries, and the repair of erosion-control infrastructure.

 
 
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Photo: Sol es VIDA

Photo: Sol es VIDA

VILLAS DEL SOL, TOA BAJA

Toa Baja — in Puerto Rico’s low lying north-central coast — is recognized to have been one of the hardest hit areas by hurricane Maria. Before the storm, most of the households in the community had wood and zinc roofs, constructed informally, and with little ability to withstand a hurricane or flood.

ConPRmetidos’ $318,000 grant to local non profit Sol es Vida will finance the installation of hurricane-resistant roofs on the homes of fourteen local families. With the help of certified architects and contractors, the project will first train local residents on how to build and install proper roofs. These trained residents will then be hired to install roofs on the remaining houses within the project. With their new, in-demand skill, these workers can provide similar roofing services in similarly affected communities, while earning needed income for their own families and communities.

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Photo: AgriTech

Photo: AgriTech

VerticaL Techno-FArms in Utuado

Access to the Barrio Mameyes community in Utuado was cut off for 6 weeks after their main bridge collapsed during Hurricane Maria, rendering them vulnerable without a sustainable food source. ConPRmetidos granted $75,000 to the COSSAO organization in Utuado, for the creation and installation of hurricane-resistant technological vertical farms. The solar powered farms will provide a reliable food source for the “barrio” year-round and work opportunities to both mothers and elders who need jobs or a sustainable way to increase their income. The vertical farms will would provide both a safety blanket in times of crisis and a reliable source of food and income throughout the year.

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Photo: KIVA

Photo: KIVA

 
 

KIVA Puerto Rico

KIVA is a non-profit organization in the U.S. that allows people to lend money to low-income entrepreneurs and students in over 80 countries. Kiva's mission is "to connect people through lending to alleviate poverty." Through their crowdfunding platform, individuals can invest as little as $25 in entrepreneurs with limited access to capital.

In Puerto Rico, Kiva is being managed by a locally incorporated non-profit organization called Causa Local.

ConPRmetidos gave Causa Local a grant of $36,000 to help them expand their impact on the island giving local entrepreneurs access to 0% loans and visibility to what they produce using the online platform throughout the Island. Causa Local’s goal for KIVA is to raise their visibility among the entrepreneurship sector in Puerto Rico and reach municipalities in more remote parts of the island. By July of 2019, Causa Local aims to grow substantially; giving out loans of up to $10k at 0% interest.

In addition to helping Causa Local expand the Kiva program to other low income and young entrepreneurs in Puerto Rico, this grant will help Causa Local continue helping entrepreneurs who have gained traction and sales and have already gone through an accelerator or incubator program.

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